Canadian Politics Thread

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Postby Chewycorns » Mon Jan 22, 2007 9:40 am

Well, the trial of accused serial killer William Pickton starts today.

vancouver sun wrote:
Pickton, 56, is charged with the murders of 26 women, most of whom were hookers and prostitutes from Vancouver's impoverished East side

If convicted on more than 14 charges, Willie Pickton will become Canada's worst serial killer.



I am surprised that more Canadians and British Columbians in Taiwan have not been talking about this case. This sort of crime is not supposed to happen in Canada is it? You can be sure if it happened in another country, especially one with a "gun" culture, a lot of hypocritical socialist Canadians would have no qualms talking about the event in a sanctimonious manner.

In fact, most of the reporters covering the case in Vancouver are "international reporters." not the local media. Many Canadians are afraid that the trial will ruin "Canada's peaceful image."

On the other site in Taiwan, there are quite a few Canadians and BCers (eg Jaboney) that are constantly talking about the US but are very quiet on Canadian matters. They have been real quiet with regards to this case.

Personally, I think the Canadian media and film industry should make a movie about these murders. The rest of the world is watching and is very interested indeed.

Then again, that would require a capitalist mindset, which is much too much to ask for from Canada's Statist media and film industry.
I believe that it is both wrong and foolhardy for any democratic state to consider international terrorism to be someone else's problem.
--US Senator Henry (Scoop) M. Jackson (D-WASH), Jerusalem, 1979.
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Postby Chewycorns » Mon Jan 22, 2007 12:46 pm

Chewycorns wrote:Well, the trial of accused serial killer William Pickton starts today.

vancouver sun wrote:
Pickton, 56, is charged with the murders of 26 women, most of whom were hookers and prostitutes from Vancouver's impoverished East side

If convicted on more than 14 charges, Willie Pickton will become Canada's worst serial killer.



I am surprised that more Canadians and British Columbians in Taiwan have not been talking about this case. This sort of crime is not supposed to happen in Canada is it? You can be sure if it happened in another country, especially one with a "gun" culture, a lot of hypocritical socialist Canadians would have no qualms talking about the event in a sanctimonious manner.

In fact, most of the reporters covering the case in Vancouver are "international reporters." not the local media. Many Canadians are afraid that the trial will ruin "Canada's peaceful image."

On the other site in Taiwan, there are quite a few Canadians and BCers (eg Jaboney) that are constantly talking about the US but are very quiet on Canadian matters. They have been real quiet with regards to this case.

Personally, I think the Canadian media and film industry should make a movie about these murders. The rest of the world is watching and is very interested indeed.

Then again, that would require a capitalist mindset, which is much too much to ask for from Canada's Statist media and film industry.


Since the publication ban has been lifted, expect a lot of "very disturbing" details to emerge with this case in the coming weeks. Evidence presented in more than a year of preliminary hearings, which has been under a publication ban, has been so gruesome that some reporters have sought psychological counseling.

Under the ban, those details have remained off limits to the print and broadcast media for publication. However, that the ban on courtroom testimony would be lifted today since neither the defense nor the prosecution has expressed any objection.

This sack of sh*t should face the firing squad. Unfortunately, with Canada's criminal justice systems, millions and millions of dollars will be spent to keep him alive in jail for the remainder of his life. Let's all hope it is a short one.


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Postby Chewycorns » Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:23 am

Day One from the trial and some very disturbing details about the crimes 8O :(

For once I find myself defending Canada. My Taiwanese wife asked me if Vancouver is a really dangerous city (she has only been there once). I mentioned that this is an isolated incident and Vancouver is pretty safe and clean. However, in my opinion the RCMP didn't give two shits about these women because they were East-side hookers. The police apprehended this worthless piece of crap before he committed some of these murders --only to let him go. If it had been middle-class suburban soccer mums being murdered, you can be damn sure the RCMP would have done better field work.

Globe and Mail wrote:
The ramshackle hobby farm of Robert William Pickton was in fact a killing field of unimaginable horrors where women were taken and butchered and disposed of like animals, according to Crown prosecutors in the long-awaited trial that started Monday.

The remains of six women ¡X not one of them intact ¡X were strewn about Mr. Pickton's 17-acre suburban Vancouver property, including the ghastly discovery of three female heads stuffed in garbage pails, Crown prosecutor Derrill Prevett told a hushed courtroom.

Police unearthed these remains in the days and months after police arrested Mr. Pickton in February 2002.

The body parts, including blood and DNA of the dead women were found throughout the muddy property ¡X in pig pens, stuffed into garbage bags, in Mr. Pickton's trailer and motorhome and even in soil samples later excavated during a massive police search.

The decomposing heads of Mona Wilson, Sereena Abotsway and Andrea Joesbury were stuffed into pails and a garbage can. The skulls were split in half with a power saw and their hands and feet were placed inside the skulls. All three skulls had been penetrated with a single bullet.

In May 2002, a piece of jaw bone was discovered in a pig trough. The jaw was cut in the chin with a power saw and matched the DNA of Brenda Wolfe.

In July 2002, more than a dozen hand bones were found in what used to be a piggery and one of those bones matched the DNA of Georgina Papin. That same month, a piece of human jaw was unearthed during the police excavation. It matched the DNA of Marnie Frey.

The personal belongings of some women were also found in Mr. Pickton's trailer, including the asthma inhaler of Ms. Abotsway and date book of Ms. Joesbury.

The grim scene was painted during Mr. Prevett's hour-long address. The Crown also told jurors that they will be shown videotapes of an 11-hour police interview with Mr. Pickton after his arrest in February 2002.

The jury will also be shown a videotape of Mr. Pickton with an undercover officer planted in his cell during his arrest.

Mr. Pickton told the cell plant that he killed a total of 49 women on his farm and he was planning to do one more to "make it an even 50."
And he bragged that he might have gotten away with his crimes but he got "sloppy," Mr. Prevett told jurors.

In the police interview, Mr. Pickton also chided officers for "bad police work."

At the end of the police interview, Mr. Pickton said he planned to "shut it down, but that's when I got sloppy."

In court Monday, Mr. Pickton sat motionless in the prisoner's box, occasionally doodling on legal pad.

Mr. Pickton's arrest and the subsequent discoveries of female body parts occurred in 2002. By then, dozens of women from Vancouver's Downtown Eastside had been reported missing. The women ¡X largely drug-addicted prostitutes ¡X began vanishing in the late 1980s. For years, their families and advocates complained that police did not take their disappearances seriously.

RCMP Inspector Don Adam, who would eventually lead the joint RCMP-Vancouver Police probe, confirmed that suspicion Monday.

Insp. Adam said the Vancouver police case was simply a missing person's probe and, by 1999, it was badly stalled. In fact, Insp. Adam said, Vancouver police concluded that women had stopped vanishing in 1999.

Insp. Adam thought otherwise and testified that he quickly suspected that the missing women were homicide victims.

The joint police probe, dubbed the Task Force on Missing Women, began compiling cases of unsolved homicides in British Columbia's Fraser Valley. They also began compiling a list of suspects, chiefly of men who had histories of violent attacks on prostitutes.

At first, the task force thought the missing women's case was linked to three unsolved murders of women whose bodies were dumped in the woods in the Fraser Valley.

But Insp. Adam did not believe the cases were linked. Eventually, the RCMP Task Force travelled south to Washington to confer with police there who were investigating the serial murder case of Gary Ridgeway, who was convicted of killing scores of Seattle-area prostitutes.

Mr. Pickton is charged with killing 26 women, but he is in court today facing six charges.

As the trial began, the judge warned jurors to ignore the fact Mr. Pickton is charged with 20 other counts of murder.

These charges are like "the elephant in the room," said Mr. Justice James Williams, warning jurors that the other charges must not affect their decision in the current trial.

"You must listen to this evidence alone," Mr. Justice Williams said.

"Because he's accused of other offences, don't assume he committed these six."

Earlier, Mr. Justice Williams warned the media against publishing evidence heard during the lengthy preliminary and pre-trial hearings.

"These bans are in place for a purpose," he said adding he will not "stand by" and watched the court orders "be flouted."

Lead Crown prosecutor Michael Petrie initially asked the judge to waive a court order that excludes families of victims from the trial.

The relatives have been subpoenaed to give evidence. Normally, witnesses are excluded from listening to evidence.

However, Mr. Petrie said relatives have a strong desire to attend the trial.

Mr. Justice Williams said he would rule on the matter later and allowed families to attend the trial's opening statements.

Mr. Pickton arrived at the courthouse at 8.15 a.m. Pacific time in an armoured vehicle.

The first-degree murder trial, which is expected to be one of the most expensive, complicated and lengthy ever held in Canada, has drawn unprecedented international attention.

About 350 reporters, photographers and technical media representatives ¡X including correspondents from the British Press Association, Time, Court TV, The Economist, Germany-based ARD television, Axel Springer, BBC radio and TV, The Washington Post and The New York Times ¡X have been accredited to report on the trial.

Court orders have prohibited the news media from revealing details of the case heard during 200 days of pretrial hearings. A publication ban continues to restrict the reporting of information until heard by the jury.



http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ ... ckton/home
Last edited by Chewycorns on Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:55 am, edited 1 time in total.
I believe that it is both wrong and foolhardy for any democratic state to consider international terrorism to be someone else's problem.
--US Senator Henry (Scoop) M. Jackson (D-WASH), Jerusalem, 1979.
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Postby Chewycorns » Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:51 am

French politicians sure love meddling in Canadian internal politics. First it was Charles De Gaulle shouting "long live a free Quebec" during Expo 67 in Montreal.

Now it is Socialist presidential candidate Segolene Royal.

Globe and Mail wrote:
Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Quebec Premier Jean Charest have taken French presidential candidate Segolene Royal to task for saying she sympathizes with the idea of Quebec sovereignty.

The Socialist hopeful was asked about her thoughts on Quebec's national question after a short meeting with Parti Québécois Leader André Boisclair in Paris on Monday.

Ms. Royal, who has never visited Quebec, said the province and France have common values, including ¡§sovereignty and Quebec's freedom.¡¨

Mr. Harper issued a statement in which he questioned the wisdom of Ms. Royal weighing in on a Canadian debate.

¡§Experience teaches that it is highly inappropriate for a foreign leader to interfere in the democratic affairs of another country,¡¨ he said.

¡§We look forward to marking the 400th anniversary of the founding of Canada at Quebec City with the next president of France.

¡§We expect in turn that the next president will display an understanding of our shared history, and the respect for Canada and Canadians that such an important partnership requires.¡¨

Speaking in Montreal, Mr. Charest said he invited Ms. Royal to Quebec after she became head of the French Socialists but that she turned him down.

¡§And furthermore, what I also know is that the future of Quebec will be decided by Quebeckers, no one else.¡¨

Federal Liberal Leader Stephane Dion, who was visiting Quebec City, said Ms. Royal's comments hurt her credibility.

Mr. Boisclair said Ms. Royal's comments show she's sympathetic to sovereignty and understands his message.

¡§I think Quebeckers will interpret Ms. Royal's remarks for themselves,¡¨ he said. ¡§It would be improper of me to do so but what people have seen is that France, in all circumstances, will be at Quebec's side.¡¨



http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ ... ional/home
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Postby Chewycorns » Tue Jan 23, 2007 11:59 am

The U.N.'s Oil for Food disgrace rolls on with new revelations on UNDP incompetence in North Korea. Funny though, none of the Canadian papers seem to talking about the Liberal Party grandee and Paul Martin mentor behind the UN in North Korea----Maurice Strong (from small town Manitoba :twisted: ).


Wall Street Journal wrote:

The U.N.'s Oil for Food disgrace rolls on, with this week's indictment by a federal prosecutor in New York of the program's former administrator Benon Sevan. But now a new dollars-for-dictators scandal is breaking into the open, this one involving the U.N. Development Program (UNDP) and North Korea's Kim Jong Il.

Our Melanie Kirkpatrick lays out many of the gory details here, based on documents reluctantly produced by the U.N. after prodding by American officials. The tale is similar to Oil for Food in that money for programs designed to benefit North Korea's poor appears to have been used instead to sustain the government. While the total amount of cash spent by the UNDP in North Korea isn't clear thanks to the opacity of U.N. record-keeping, any hard currency is manna from Turtle Bay for the isolated Kim regime. If dollar amounts into the tens of millions over nine years are accurate, that's money that would have helped Kim stay in power and continue his nuclear weapons program.

The documents we've seen follow the program back to 1998 and the era of detente between Kim and the Clinton Administration. But what's especially alarming is that the UNDP's programs have persisted in North Korea even as Kim has banished U.N. weapons inspectors, raised the volume on his threats, tested long-range missiles and even tested a nuclear weapon--all in defiance of the U.N.'s own stated positions and Security Council sanctions.

A defense that the UNDP merely does humanitarian work--for the people of North Korea and not the government--isn't credible given the details exposed by Ms. Kirkpatrick. U.N. officials can't even say with confidence that all of the "development" projects exist because they haven't been allowed to visit their sites. Pyongyang officials insist on payments in cash that become fungible hard currency for the regime. Every U.N. dollar is one more that Kim doesn't have to raise from other (and often illegal) sources to pay off his generals or to buy a nuclear centrifuge.

The desire in some circles, including parts of the U.S. State Department, will be to dismiss all of this as no big deal because the bigger game is getting Kim to end his nuclear program. So why let a little more U.N. corruption, or incompetence, interfere with serious diplomacy?

Well, one reason is because we still don't know how wide or deep this scandal is, especially if it extends to other U.N. programs operating in North Korea. Another is that any cash to Kim contradicts U.N. and U.S. policy and helps ease pressure on the dictator to give up his nukes. And then there is the matter of the U.N.'s own credibility and failure to reform. In the wake of Oil for Food especially, why would U.N. officials allow this program to continue?

The generous explanation is incompetence, or perhaps the kind of feckless idealism that really believes such a program helps poor Koreans apart from Kim's regime. But given the U.N.'s recent track record of indictments for corruption, more venal motives need to be investigated. And it is also worth asking whether outright hostility to the U.S. policy of trying to isolate Kim has also played a role.

Whatever the motive, the Cash for Kim scandal is one more blot on the record of former Secretary General Kofi Annan. It also raises questions about the role played in North Korea by Maurice Strong, the Canadian who was Mr. Annan's envoy to Pyongyang.

We'd feel a lot better if the U.N. had quickly responded to U.S. queries and tried to get to the bottom of the mess at UNDP. But the exchange of letters between U.S. Ambassador Mark Wallace and UNDP officials described by Ms. Kirkpatrick is certainly reminiscent of the early U.N. stonewalling on Oil for Food.

Mr. Wallace and his colleagues from other nations on the UNDP executive board are right to demand a stop to the program and an independent investigation. The U.N.'s new Secretary General, Ban Ki-Moon, could make his own early mark by calling for a probe as part of a new era of U.N. transparency. Democrats in Congress could also be constructive by insisting on accountability, especially given how much stock they put in a competent U.N. to promote American security.

One lesson of Oil for Food, and its failure to lead to any serious reform, is that to some foreign policy elites there can be no such thing as a U.N. "scandal." That's because for them the U.N. is all about good intentions, and the hopes and dreams for peace, rather than about actual results. But it is precisely that forbearance that has allowed too many dictators to exploit the U.N. for their own purposes, and has brought Turtle Bay to its current low ebb. Getting to the bottom of Cash for Kim is one more chance to make the U.N. shape up, and to stop financing a global menace in the bargain.



http://www.opinionjournal.com/editorial ... =110009548
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_Strong
I believe that it is both wrong and foolhardy for any democratic state to consider international terrorism to be someone else's problem.
--US Senator Henry (Scoop) M. Jackson (D-WASH), Jerusalem, 1979.
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Postby Chewycorns » Wed Jan 24, 2007 9:29 pm

It has been a year since Stephen Harper and the Conservatives beat the scandal-plagued Liberanos in Canada. Now, it is great to see that the press in America are giving him credit for a job well done so far!!!!!

However, the Canadian state-run press in Ottawa are hardly as fair and objective (Mulroney once call them phony bastards who are all married to one another and whose wives are on the payroll of the CBC). The Liberal party apparatchiks in the media continue to be very hostile to Harper, and, as mentioned in the article, are convinced that he would destroy Canada's social safety net, sell people's mothers to oil companies, and sign us up as the 51st US state if given a majority government.

However, as the article suggests, these fears are misplaced as Harper has made some significant achievements in the foreign policy arena and stuck to a"middle path" in domestic policy.

Let's hope Canadians are wise enough to give the Conservatives a majority government in 2007.

The article is spot on when it states that Canada is a country without significant conservative infrastructure, or conservative media (with the exception of the Calgary-based Western Standard and the Sun media chain).

Stephen faces an uphill battle but he was suprised a lot of people so far!!!!


Christian Science Monitor wrote:
Tuesday marks one year since Stephen Harper led Conservatives to power, becoming Canada's first right-of-center prime minister in 12 years. In late 2005, Mr. Harper was possibly the only Canadian who believed he would win.

A wonk extraordinaire, known for his love of policy debates and classic "Star Trek" ¡V rumor has it that as a youth he attended Trek conventions and competed in costume contests ¡V Harper didn't seem the type to set voters' hearts afire. And with his blunt approach, robotic exterior, and awkward smile, he didn't. But thanks to his ability to learn from past mistakes, and to a reigning Liberal Party mired in scandal, he surprised nearly everyone with a triumph.


Even Harper's foes bow to his political savvy, focus, and intelligence. He has navigated the past year with only a minority government, meaning he needs opposition support to pass legislation. As a result, he has done little domestically that could reasonably be called radical. He has replaced left-leaning spending and social engineering with centrist spending and social engineering. For example, a national day-care plan proposed by his liberal predecessors was scrapped in favor of issuing monthly $100 checks to parents of children under the age of six. He has cut Canada's goods and services tax by 1 percent. And while he has made cuts to social programs, he has steered clear of touching the "third rails" of Canadian politics ¡V socialized healthcare and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

Time magazine named him Canada's top newsmaker of 2006, noting his emergence as a "warrior in power." The terminology is telling, since the area where Canadians have seen the most change has been in their country's foreign policy. Notably, Canada's new prime minister has not engaged in any gratuitous anti-Americanism. That's a standard Canadian political tactic, guaranteed to please the "blue-state" denizens of Vancouver, Montreal, and Toronto.

Where the war on terror is concerned, he has been, by Canadian standards, revolutionary. For decades, Canadians have loved the image of themselves as "neutral," peacekeeping do-gooders who don't actually fight. This is an image difficult to reconcile with past reality, and with the present reality in Afghanistan, where approximately 2,300 Canadian soldiers currently serve. While it was a Liberal prime minister, Jean Chrétien, who committed Canada to the war in Afghanistan, neither he nor his successor, Paul Martin, were as vocal and steadfast in their support for the mission as has been Harper.

Harper has shown similar strength in his support for Israel. After the Palestinian elections last January, Canada cut off relations to the Hamas-led government. When Hizbullah rockets began pummeling Israel last summer, Harper affirmed that Canada stood with Israel. Gone were the usual mealy-mouthed statements coming out of Ottawa, the vestiges of the Trudeau-era romanticizing and courting of terrorists and dictators.

This kind of principled stance and impressive leadership has earned him some respect, and cost him some support. It has also earned him the nickname, "Bush Lite." Many who know Harper call this unfair, saying these have always been his ideals, not something newly acquired to please Washington.

Which is not to say Harper is above political pandering. He threw red meat to his socially conservative base by revisiting the same-sex marriage issue. The law stayed in place, but this was widely believed to be Harper's attempt to say to supporters, "Hey, I tried. Now let me get on with governing." He is also not above breaking promises ¡V such as his campaign pledge to leave income trusts alone. A tax was slapped on trusts in an autumn decision dubbed the "Halloween massacre."

In December, the Liberal Party elected a new leader, Stéphane Dion of Quebec. He trails Harper in polls, but not by much. Dion is a supporter of the Kyoto Protocol (which Canada has ratified) and seems to mention global warming with each breath. He even has a dog named Kyoto. This puts Harper, a cat lover and not a Kyoto supporter, in a bind. His power base is in oil-rich Alberta, where Kyoto is unpopular.

That won't be Harper's only challenge. Canada is a country without significant conservative infrastructure, or conservative media. The result is a peddling of hysteria about Harper's alleged "hidden agenda" ¡V a conviction that, with a majority government, he would destroy Canada's social safety net, sell our mothers to oil companies, and sign us up as the 51st US state.

Those fears, however unfounded, are what stopped Canadians just short of giving Harper and his Conservatives a majority last time, and are what he needs to allay. If anyone can do it, it's Stephen Harper. He's certainly surprised us before.



http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/0123/p09s01-coop.html
I believe that it is both wrong and foolhardy for any democratic state to consider international terrorism to be someone else's problem.
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Postby Chewycorns » Thu Jan 25, 2007 8:59 am

Stephane Dion and the Liberals make another blunder. Clearly in the mind of the Liberals, disgraced organizers from the Sponsorship Scandal ARE welcome in the Party.

This move to possibly welcome Cote back into the Party will not play well in Quebec. Thanks to the late Seperatist Premier Rene Levesque (who fought with US troops during WW2 and liberated Dachau, unlike Trudeau who wore SS Nazi uniforms) Quebec has some of the cleanest laws regarding political money. They certainly do like being tarnished by these dirty Liberals. Then again, should we be surprised? Dion was the Unity Minister under Chretien. The old boys are back.

If Quebecers are forced to choose between "dirty" Federalists and "clean" sovereignists, they will choose the latter.

globe and mail wrote:The sponsorship scandal came back to haunt Liberals Wednesday after newly minted leader Stephane Dion suggested at least one of the organizers disgraced by the affair should be welcomed back into the party.

Mr. Dion was forced to clarify after telling a Quebec newspaper he has no objections to Marc-Yvan Cote, a former key party organizer in eastern Quebec, being allowed to resume his Liberal membership.

He told Le Soleil that Mr. Cote's punishment was exaggerated, that he'd recognized his error and shouldn't be penalized for life. He stressed, however, that no decision had been made to readmit Mr. Cote and that it was up to the party president to decide.

Mr. Cote was one of 10 members banned for life from the federal party by former prime minister Paul Martin in a bid to contain the political damage from the sponsorship scandal.
Related to this article


The scandal — in which ad executives admitted paying millions in kickbacks to the Quebec wing of the party in return for lucrative federal sponsorship contracts — devastated the party in Quebec and ultimately helped drive the Liberals out of power.

During the Gomery inquiry into the scandal, Mr. Cote testified he received $120,000 in $100 bills from the director general of the party's Quebec wing. He distributed that money to 12 Liberal candidates in the 1997 federal election.
Mr. Dion himself was never implicated in the scandal, although he was the unity minister when the Chretien government created the sponsorship program in the wake of the nail-biter 1995 referendum on Quebec independence. The program was supposed to help raise the federal government's profile in Quebec.

With the election of Mr. Dion as leader last month, Liberals had hoped they'd finally turned the page on the sponsorship scandal and would be able to capitalize on their new leader's unblemished reputation for integrity.

The ruling Tories pounced on Mr. Dion's remarks to charge that the Liberal party remains corrupt, despite the change in leadership.

"A year ago, Canadians rejected Liberal corruption and Liberal scandal and Liberal waste and it's clear that Mr. Dion, and the Liberal party, just doesn't get it and didn't understand that," said Justice Minister Rob Nicholson.

"He's made a decision to welcome back into the Liberal party disgraced organizers that were associated with the sponsorship scandal."
Clearly worried that his remarks to Le Soleil, published Wednesday, might revive the controversy, Mr. Dion was much more guarded when he spoke to reporters at the close of a two-day Liberal caucus meeting.

He said none of the 10 expelled members has requested readmission to the party and, should any of them do so, there is a process the party would follow in determining whether to welcome them back.

"I have no recommendation to make . . . It's not my job to make recommendation to the party through the media."

Senator Marie Poulin, the party's president, also stressed that Mr. Cote has not reapplied for membership. Should he or any of the other expelled members do so, she said the party would follow its normal process.

All applications are reviewed by a committee within 20 days. If an application is rejected, the applicant can appeal.

Initially, a number of Liberal MPs echoed Mr. Dion's comments in Le Soleil, saying Mr. Cote should be welcomed back.

Montreal MP Marlene Jennings said the "public notoriety" surrounding his testimony and expulsion from the party was punishment enough for Mr. Cote.

"He's definitely paid for it."
However, MPs were clearly uncomfortable about the prospect of lifting the lifetime ban on more notorious sponsorship figures such as Alfonso Gagliano, the former minister who oversaw the sponsorship program.

"It's not my decision," snapped Toronto MP Bill Graham, who served as interim leader during the leadership contest.

By the end of the caucus meeting, however, MPs had rolled up the welcome mat altogether.
"We're a new party and we have to go forward with new people," said Francis Scarpaleggia, Mr. Dion's new Quebec lieutenant, adding that he doesn't personally favour readmitting Cote to the party.

In the Le Soleil interview, Mr. Dion also defended Jean Pelletier, former prime minister Jean Chretien's chief of staff, saying he had served the country well for decades.

Mr. Pelletier was fired by Mr. Martin from his job as head of Via Rail. Justice John Gomery concluded that Mr. Pelletier was responsible for the sponsorship program, although he was never directly implicated in any wrongdoing.
Mr. Pelletier is suing the government for wrongful dismissal from his Via job and has gone to court to have Mr. Gomery's findings overturned.

Mr. Pelletier has won one round in court over his dismissal from Via and Mr. Dion told reporters he's happy for him.

I believe that it is both wrong and foolhardy for any democratic state to consider international terrorism to be someone else's problem.
--US Senator Henry (Scoop) M. Jackson (D-WASH), Jerusalem, 1979.
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Postby dogface » Thu Jan 25, 2007 9:31 am

Is this an echo chamber Chewy? :lol:

The serial killer guy is pretty gruesome. 8O

I was watching the news the other day; one of the victims' (a single mom, hooker drug addict) mother said, "She was a good girl and never told a lie in her life. If something from the house was missing, like a camera or a tv, I'd ask her about it and she'd say, 'Yeah, I sold it for drugs.'"

I have a hard time wrapping my mind around that one.

49 women from the same general area? Is that correct? VC police suck that bad?
Two cannibals were eating a clown.

One said to the other "Does this taste funny?"
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Postby Chewycorns » Thu Jan 25, 2007 10:44 am

dogface wrote:Is this an echo chamber Chewy? :lol:

The serial killer guy is pretty gruesome. 8O

I was watching the news the other day; one of the victims' (a single mom, hooker drug addict) mother said, "She was a good girl and never told a lie in her life. If something from the house was missing, like a camera or a tv, I'd ask her about it and she'd say, 'Yeah, I sold it for drugs.'"

I have a hard time wrapping my mind around that one.

49 women from the same general area? Is that correct? VC police suck that bad?


Yip. Mr. Pickton told an undercover police officer, placed in Mr. Pickton¡¦s cell after his arrest, that he had killed 49 women and had planned to kill one more.

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police arrived at the pig farm in early 2002, to search Mr. Pickton¡¦s double-wide trailer. He was arrested on the weapons charge and later released.

But during the search, the authorities found an asthma inhaler, used syringes and documents belonging to Sereena Abotsway, one of dozens of prostitutes who had been reported missing over two decades.



In my opinion, the Vancouver police did piss-poor investigation work.

According to the RCMP:

Vancouver Sun wrote:The group was trying to review the 1,300 tips collected by Vancouver police but the work was slow and the computer system being used by the VPD was in "such disarray and so ill-supported" that it did nothing for the RCMP except "waste our time."

Adam said his task force identified a number of systemic problems facing the Vancouver police in its investigation prior to 2001: the lack of a missing person's DNA databank in B.C., no way to compare the DNA of missing women to the 130 unidentified remains at the coroner's service, and old DNA of suspects in similar cases never being analysed.



http://www.canada.com/vancouversun/news ... 3776b8f016
I believe that it is both wrong and foolhardy for any democratic state to consider international terrorism to be someone else's problem.
--US Senator Henry (Scoop) M. Jackson (D-WASH), Jerusalem, 1979.
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Postby Chewycorns » Thu Jan 25, 2007 11:14 am

As much as 50 per cent of the world's pirated movies come........China? No------Canada :twisted: :twisted:

I love it that Canada is now being compared to the Philippines and China. :twisted: :twisted: Of course, liberals in Canada will probably complain that this is Fox's revenge for the Liberal Party's ban of Fox News into Canada a few years back (being the huge proponents of free speech that they are). :lol: :lol:


CanWest News Service wrote:
As much as 50 per cent of the world's pirated movies come from Canada, prompting the film industry to threaten to delay the release of new titles in this country.

According to an investigation by Twentieth Century Fox, most of the illegal recording, or "camcording," is taking place in Montreal movie houses, taking advantage of bilingual releases and lax copyright laws.

"In Quebec, it is much more advantageous because you get both English and French. You cover a bigger part of the world," said Ellis Jacob, chief executive of the Cineplex Entertainment theatre chain. "They are using Canada because they can have the movie out on the street in the Philippines and China before it even releases there."
J
acob said he was warned in a letter from Bruce Snyder, president of Fox's domestic distribution, that if Canada doesn't do something to curb its growing piracy problem, Hollywood will.

"They are definitely thinking about delaying releases in Canada," said Jacob. "This is very, very bad for our Canadian consumer and it's bad for the industry as a whole."

Recent movies including Children of Men, Borat, Night at the Museum and Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest have been made available on the Internet days after they were released.

The movie industry has complained that the Canadian Copyright Act, as well as the internal policies of police forces including the RCMP, make it extremely difficult for them to crack down on movie piracy.

Under the act, anyone caught copying a movie without the studio's consent can face criminal charges and jailed or fined up to $25,000. Copyright holders can also take civil action against someone who has infringed on their property.

However, Jacob said convicting someone is difficult.

"You have to prove that the person was camcording and using it to generate revenue. It is virtually impossible to do that," he said." Unless you can assign blame to the person recording in your theatre, your law doesn't have any teeth."

Serge Corriveau, vice-president and national director of the Canadian Motion Picture Distributors Association, said law enforcement agencies don't see movie piracy as a big problem.

"We are not getting any enforcement," said Corriveau. "The only thing they can do is kick them out."

Cineplex's Jacob said theatre chains all across Canada already employ security guards who are equipped with night vision goggles and other surveillance equipment to try to catch pirates.

But he questioned how far the industry must go to protect itself.

"I don't want to make it an uncomfortable environment to go to the movies," said Jacob. "At the end of the day, we don't want to turn these places into airport check-ins."

Changes to laws in the United States have seen movie piracy in that country plummet.



http://www.canada.com/topics/entertainm ... 50&k=12321


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--US Senator Henry (Scoop) M. Jackson (D-WASH), Jerusalem, 1979.
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Postby Chewycorns » Fri Jan 26, 2007 3:29 pm

Well, it looks like the Canadian government has agreed to pay compensation to Maher Arar. Arar, who lives in Interior British Columbia, will receive CDN$10 million from the government. Will he accept? Or go for higher damages?


UPI wrote:
The Canadian government has reportedly agreed to pay compensation to a Syrian-born Canadian who was deported to his native country by the United States.

Maher Arar, who now lives in Kamloops, British Columbia, is to receive an apology, $10 million Canadian ($8.5 million U.S.) and payment of his legal fees, the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. reported. Prime Minister Stephen Harper was expected to make the announcement Friday afternoon.

Arar, an engineer, was arrested at Kennedy International Airport in New York in 2002 as he returned to his home in Ottawa from vacation. He was sent to Syria, where he spent a year in prison and was tortured.

Under the U.S. government's international rendition program, terrorism suspects have been sent to countries like Syria and Egypt where they could be subject to almost unrestrained interrogation. Arar had been seeking much higher damages from Canada for the government's part in the deportation.



http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/view.php?S ... 2250-9498r
I believe that it is both wrong and foolhardy for any democratic state to consider international terrorism to be someone else's problem.
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Re: Canadian Politics Thread

Postby Chewycorns » Mon Mar 28, 2011 3:17 am

Vorkosigan on another unnamed Forum wrote:Chewy, saying that "the occupation began in 1948", even if it were incorrect, would not make her an anti-Semite, unless you believe that all opposition to Israeli foreign policy is anti-Semitic.
http://www.forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopi ... &start=130"


Vorkosigan:

Since I'm banned on the unnamed Forum (for standing up for myself when an underprivileged/financially irresponsible person that received donor money from Forumosa so she wouldn't lose her car criticized me for asking details --specifically if another person who needed help [fire victim] --had insurance [would have impacted how much I gave]), I'll reply to you here (that they limit debate and that there are so many board refugees of substance over here speaks volumes).

To answer your question though, lots of politicians on the left oppose Israel's foreign policy. I don't have a problem with that (although I disagree with their viewpoints), but it should be intelligent discourse. When you get information wrong, when you basically tow the same line as Hamas, when your party has a history of making such incorrect remarks and most importantly, when you are a deputy leader of a national political party, you will be called out on such irresponsible comments.

And she was: by even people on that side of the political spectrum such as Bob Rae from Canada's Federal Liberal Party who said:

Bob Rae wrote:These are not the off-the-cuff ramblings of any ill-informed or biased person," Liberal foreign affairs critic Bob Rae said in a statement Tuesday. "Ms. Davies is the deputy leader of a political party that aspires to reflect and represent the views of Canada on the international stage. In this role, fully cognizant of her responsibilities, she stated that Israel has been occupying territories since 1948, the year of its independence. The logical implication of these comments is that Israel has no right to exist."
Rae also said Davies erred in suggesting that this was "the longest occupation in the world," explaining that it reflects a "complete disregard" for the facts.
"This is a position that is more than just 'unacceptable,'" said Rae. "This rhetoric is responsible for more than 'confusion,' and an 'inadvertent error,' as Ms. Davies now suggests. The appropriate decision, given her stature and responsibilities with the NDP, is for Mr. Layton to ask for her resignation as deputy leader and for Ms. Davies to issue an apology to all Canadians. Nothing short of that will do." http://stevejanke.com/archives/302676.php


Of course, the Green Party and NDP Party in Canada (with the exception of pro-Israel MP Mulcair) have a long history of anti-Semitism. Examples:

Green Party Leader Elizabeth May is affirming her support for an Ottawa-area Green Party candidate accused of “Israel bashing,” just one day after citing anti-Semitism as grounds for rejecting one of her B.C. candidates.

Qais Ghanem, a Yemeni-born physician with a strong interest in the Middle East, has stirred debate among his fellow Greens on the party's online discussion forum. The Greens' Ottawa-South candidate has aligned himself with three other Green candidates to form what they call the “Ottawa Group of Four.” They are pushing the party to approve a resolution called “Palestine” that “calls upon Israel to end its forty-year occupation of all Arab lands without preconditions.”
http://thecanadiansentinel.blogspot.com ... slamo.html


What about these comments from a former federal NDP candidate?:

National Post wrote:"I like the part in Schindler's List when the guard starts waxing the prisoners" http://network.nationalpost.com/np/blog ... -quot.aspx


Its been tough. And I'm in a male-dominated union, where ninety per cent men, and a lot of middle-aged brothers and I am in the minority; We have vocal Zionists in our worksites, and we have had to battle them.
http://www.straight.com/article-209199/ ... apologized


But should we expect anything more from a federal political party whose leader and wife lived in social subsidized housing when they were making substantial money sitting on Toronto's city council?

Such moral dishonesty. Surprised that Jaboney doesn't bring that up instead of smart-assed comments about spending 40 years in the wilderness :lol: :lol: He criticizes Harper for ethics, but I think when Canadians compare any Conservative shortcomings with the Liberal sponsorship scandal and wealth redistribution or NDP real-life thieves (of the Svend Robinson or Jack Layton type) they'll see that the other two parties are much scarier indeed. Of course, such real life metrics probably don't enter Jaboney's thought processes very regularly if at all. :lol:

We have not been forgotten how corrupt and dishonest the Liberals were when in power, nor have we forgotten how Jack Layton and Olivia Chow lived together in subsidized housing in Toronto, while feeding at the public trough as Toronto aldermen. Jack Layton is calling for Peter McKay's resignation while at the same time everyone knows that Jack Layton is little better than a common horse thief.


http://www.tvo.org/cfmx/tvoorg/theagend ... ction=blog
Last edited by Chewycorns on Sun Apr 03, 2011 5:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
I believe that it is both wrong and foolhardy for any democratic state to consider international terrorism to be someone else's problem.
--US Senator Henry (Scoop) M. Jackson (D-WASH), Jerusalem, 1979.
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Re: Canadian Politics Thread

Postby Chewycorns » Sun Apr 03, 2011 5:05 am

Great article criticizing Ms. May, the Canadian Green Party and their anti-Semitic tendencies.



To cap her demonstrably opportunistic and rather demonic flagellate, she then went on to compare Mr. Harper, and by extension, his CONSERVATIVE government, with the late British PM Neville Chamberlain and his appeasement of the Nazis.

This is where the offence is unforgivable.

For those still not cotton on to the oaf, she is essentially saying that Mr. Harper’s principled, measured leadership in keeping us away from the cataclysmic Kyoto fantasies that would surely shutter this country’s industry is akin to what is considered by less generous historians as Neville Chamberlain’s facilitation of the rail carts that carried millions of Jews to their fiery and unearthly deaths. No word on whether she was, too, including Russians, Catholics or Armenians, but her point was clear enough.

And I wrote, she is “saying” (present tense) and not “said” (past tense), since, incredibly, not only has she never apologized for her disgusting comments, but more incredibly her party stood behind her while she remained defiant. Not one of dimbells Adrienne Carr, Jane Sterk, or any of the other cookie cutter, nasty school marms that seem to lead this failed green movement found even the thinnest of moral fibres from which to swiftly and appropriately condemn such oratorical treachery.

Are there reasons to criticize Stephen Harper? Of course there are. Even he knows he’s hardly perfect, his makeshift piano recitals with mouthy twelve year olds are specifically designed to address this. His refusal to wear a memorial lapel ribbon every AIDS Day is one that annoys me. His inability to understand that agitating an already Liberal-loving media doesn’t bear fruit is yet anohter. Most recently, his shockingly sophomoric performance in this campaign’s first week is one more.

But to suggest that any of our Canadian Prime Ministers, as, love them or hate them, they belong to all of us certainly while they’re in office, are comparable to a Nazi appeaser is the kind of rhetoric that should land one in prison for the most scurrilous of hate speech. We’ve jailed people for lesser crimes.
Either that, or a niftily padded room would suffice.

Ms. May didn’t hesitate to join so many other fools like federal NDP nit Libby Davies, provincial NDP Israel-hater Mable Elmore, former Vision Vancouver Clr. trollop Jim Green and eco-nutter David Suzuki as being so beyond insensitive to the fine Jewish people and their history.
They all used Nazi analogies to describe opponents in the past. In point of fact, Ms. May has invariably exceeded them.


http://alexgtsakumis.com/2011/04/01/eli ... te-speech/
I believe that it is both wrong and foolhardy for any democratic state to consider international terrorism to be someone else's problem.
--US Senator Henry (Scoop) M. Jackson (D-WASH), Jerusalem, 1979.
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Re: Canadian Politics Thread

Postby Chewycorns » Sun Apr 10, 2011 3:38 am

Really sad to see that dementia has silenced one of Canada's most colorful and successful politicians (in a country where being boring seems like a national trait--just like it is for Canada's expats in Taiwan :lol: :lol: ).

Name me a better populist politician in the last 50 years in Canada than Ralph Klein. I don't think you could. His legacy is a strong one. He was able to defeat the PC machine (who supported Nancy Betkowski in the early 90s) and started deficit reduction before it was vogue with Paul Martin and the federal liberals). He won three elections and left AB in very strong financial shape. He was a populist (unlike predecessor politicians in AB like Harvard-educated Peter Lougheed).

He was well liked by many US politicians


Fomer Alberta premier Ralph Klein is suffering from a form of dementia that is robbing him of the ability to speak, say reports.

Rod Love, a former Klein aide and longtime friend to the former premier, confirmed to The Canadian Press the 68-year-old former premier has been diagnosed with dementia.

"For the greatest political communicator of our generation, it's tough to see," said Love.

"I've spent 30 years of my life with him so it's a bit of a shock."

Klein's wife Colleen told the Calgary Herald in an interview that her husband was diagnosed last Friday with frontal temporal dementia, consistent with primary progressive aphasia. The diagnosis came after months of tests and visits with specialists.

The aphasia has left Klein unable to speak more than just a few short words and phrases. Colleen Klein says her husband now has trouble focusing on reading, spends much of his day napping, and has problems with his memory.

Just four months ago, the Kleins confirmed the former premier also suffers from the smoking-related lung disease, emphysema.

Love said the dementia is in the early stages.

"He's got good days. I had lunch with him six weeks ago. Some of the boys took him down to Palm Springs for a little break during the winter a couple of months ago, so he's got good days and he's got days that aren't so good."

http://ottawa.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/C ... OttawaHome

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--US Senator Henry (Scoop) M. Jackson (D-WASH), Jerusalem, 1979.
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Re: Canadian Politics Thread

Postby 1stDrinkOfTheDay » Mon Apr 18, 2011 1:10 pm

Is this the Chewy thread?

I'm voting.
First in quite some time.
In a heavy Conservative rural area.
Many years ago, I would have voted Liberal, or NDP, or even worse, fringe freaks like Reform or Green.
In Kanada, one must vote weigh the worth of the seat for which one votes. Situational ethics.

This year, my head tells me to vote Conservative, but when I'm immersed in the utter degenerate depravity upon which the local Tory draws his support from, then I think I'm going back out.

Sorry, Chewy, but it looks like I'm voting either Green or NDP. Anything but the Liberals, that's my tact.
Especially as Layton pretty much wiped the floor with everyone during what some actullay have the nerve to call a debate. Which isn't saying much I well realize, but it's far better than the rest of the blowhards, who often can't even manage to dish out a coherent phrase.

Simply shocking, I say.
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